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SPATIOTEMPORAL TRENDS OF CASES OF PANDEMIC INFLUENZA A(H1N1)PDM09 IN ARGENTINA, 2009-2012

Overview of attention for article published in Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, April 2015
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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11 Mendeley
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Title
SPATIOTEMPORAL TRENDS OF CASES OF PANDEMIC INFLUENZA A(H1N1)PDM09 IN ARGENTINA, 2009-2012
Published in
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, April 2015
DOI 10.1590/s0036-46652015000200006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos M. LEVEAU, Osvaldo UEZ, Marta N. VACCHINO

Abstract

The aim of this paper was to analyze the spatiotemporal variations of cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Argentina. A space-time permutation scan statistic was performed to test the non-randomness in the interaction between space and time in reported influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases. In 2009, two clusters were recorded in the east of Buenos Aires Province (May and June) and in the central and northern part of Argentina (July and August). Between 2011 and 2012, clusters near areas bordering other countries were registered. Within the clusters, in 2009, the high notification rates were first observed in the school-age population and then extended to the older population (15-59 years). From 2011 onwards, higher rates of reported cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 occurred in children under five years in center of the country. Two stages of transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 can be characterized. The first stage had high rates of notification and a possible interaction with individuals from other countries in the major cities of Argentina (pattern of hierarchy), and the second stage had an increased interaction in some border areas without a clear pattern of hierarchy. These results suggest the need for greater coordination in the Southern Cone countries, in order to implement joint prevention and vaccination policies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2015.
All research outputs
#15,391,100
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#325
of 428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,906
of 238,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#8
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 428 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,886 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.