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Bifactor analysis and construct validity of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ) in non-clinical Spanish samples

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, April 2015
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Title
Bifactor analysis and construct validity of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ) in non-clinical Spanish samples
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, April 2015
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00404
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jaume Aguado, Juan V. Luciano, Ausias Cebolla, Antoni Serrano-Blanco, Joaquim Soler, Javier García-Campayo

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to examine the dimensionality, reliability, and construct validity of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) in three Spanish samples using structural equation modeling (SEM). Pooling the FFMQ data from 3 Spanish samples (n = 1191), we estimated the fit of two competing models (correlated five-factor vs. bifactor) via confirmatory factor analysis. The factorial invariance of the best fitting model across meditative practice was also addressed. The pattern of relationships between the FFMQ latent dimensions and anxiety, depression, and distress was analyzed using SEM. FFMQ reliability was examined by computing the omega and omega hierarchical coefficients. The bifactor model, which accounted for the covariance among FFMQ items with regard to one general factor (mindfulness) and five orthogonal factors (observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judgment, and non-reactivity), fit the FFMQ structure better than the correlated five-factor model. The relationships between the latent variables and their manifest indicators were not invariant across the meditative experience. Observing items had significant loadings on the general mindfulness factor, but only in the meditator sub-sample. The SEM analysis revealed significant links between mindfulness and symptoms of depression and stress. When the general factor was partialled out, the acting with awareness facet did not show adequate reliability. The FFMQ shows a robust bifactor structure among Spanish individuals. Nevertheless, the Observing subscale does not seem to be adequate for assessing mindfulness in individuals without meditative experience.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 181 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 5 3%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 173 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 14%
Researcher 26 14%
Student > Bachelor 25 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 10%
Student > Master 15 8%
Other 44 24%
Unknown 27 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 88 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 9%
Social Sciences 14 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 4%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Other 16 9%
Unknown 37 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2015.
All research outputs
#18,409,030
of 22,803,211 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#22,114
of 29,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,639
of 264,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#390
of 469 outputs
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