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Overuse of antibiotics for the common cold – attitudes and behaviors among doctors in rural areas of Shandong Province, China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

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4 tweeters
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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54 Dimensions

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Overuse of antibiotics for the common cold – attitudes and behaviors among doctors in rural areas of Shandong Province, China
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40360-015-0009-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiang Sun, Oliver J Dyar, Lingbo Zhao, Göran Tomson, Lennart E Nilsson, Malin Grape, Yanyan Song, Ling Yan, Cecilia Stålsby Lundborg

Abstract

Irrational antibiotic use is common in rural areas of China, despite the growing recognition of the importance of appropriate prescribing to contain antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze doctors' attitudes and prescribing practices related to antibiotics in rural areas of Shandong province, focusing on patients with the common cold. A survey was conducted with doctors working at thirty health facilities (village clinics, township health centers and county general hospitals) in three counties within Shandong province. Questions were included on knowledge and attitudes towards antibiotic prescribing. Separately, a random selection of prescriptions for patients with the common cold was collected from the healthcare institutions at which the doctors worked, to investigate actual prescribing behaviors. A total of 188 doctors completed the survey. Most doctors (83%, 149/180) had attended training on antibiotic use since the beginning of their medical practice as a doctor, irrespective of the academic level of their undergraduate training. Of those that had training, most had attended it within the past three years (97%, 112/116). Very few doctors (2%, 3/187) said they would give antibiotics to a patient with symptoms of a common cold, and the majority (87%, 156/179) would refuse to prescribe an antibiotic even if patients were insistent on getting them. Doctors who had attended training were less likely to give antibiotics in this circumstance (29% vs. 14%, p < 0.001). A diagnosis of common cold was the only diagnosis reported on 1590 out of 8400 prescriptions. Over half (55%, 869/1590) of them included an antibiotic. Prescriptions from village clinics were more likely to contain an antibiotic than those from other healthcare institutions (71% vs. 44% [township] vs. 47% [county], p < 0.001). Most doctors have recently attended training on antibiotic use and report they would not prescribe antibiotics for patients with a common cold, even when placed under pressure by patients. However, more than half of the prescriptions from these healthcare institutions for patients with the common cold included an antibiotic. Exploring and addressing gaps between knowledge and practice is critical to improving antibiotic use in rural China.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 76 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 21%
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 13 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 35%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 18 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2017.
All research outputs
#4,382,728
of 14,498,896 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#96
of 302 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,896
of 229,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,498,896 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 302 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them