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Sleep smart—optimizing sleep for declarative learning and memory

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
58 X users
facebook
14 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
295 Mendeley
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Title
Sleep smart—optimizing sleep for declarative learning and memory
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, May 2015
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00622
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gordon B. Feld, Susanne Diekelmann

Abstract

The last decade has witnessed a spurt of new publications documenting sleep's essential contribution to the brains ability to form lasting memories. For the declarative memory domain, slow wave sleep (the deepest sleep stage) has the greatest beneficial effect on the consolidation of memories acquired during preceding wakefulness. The finding that newly encoded memories become reactivated during subsequent sleep fostered the idea that reactivation leads to the strengthening and transformation of the memory trace. According to the active system consolidation account, trace reactivation leads to the redistribution of the transient memory representations from the hippocampus to the long-lasting knowledge networks of the cortex. Apart from consolidating previously learned information, sleep also facilitates the encoding of new memories after sleep, which probably relies on the renormalization of synaptic weights during sleep as suggested by the synaptic homeostasis theory. During wakefulness overshooting potentiation causes an imbalance in synaptic weights that is countered by synaptic downscaling during subsequent sleep. This review briefly introduces the basic concepts and central findings of the research on sleep and memory, and discusses implications of this lab-based work for everyday applications to make the best possible use of sleep's beneficial effect on learning and memory.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 295 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 286 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 49 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 46 16%
Student > Master 35 12%
Researcher 33 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 7%
Other 48 16%
Unknown 63 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 78 26%
Neuroscience 43 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 3%
Other 39 13%
Unknown 74 25%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 91. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2023.
All research outputs
#450,755
of 24,770,025 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#923
of 33,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,004
of 269,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#14
of 497 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,770,025 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 33,413 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 497 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.