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Experimental Dosing of Wetlands with Coagulants Removes Mercury from Surface Water and Decreases Mercury Bioaccumulation in Fish

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Experimental Dosing of Wetlands with Coagulants Removes Mercury from Surface Water and Decreases Mercury Bioaccumulation in Fish
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, May 2015
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b00655
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua T. Ackerman, Tamara E. C. Kraus, Jacob A. Fleck, David P. Krabbenhoft, William R. Horwath, Sandra M. Bachand, Mark P. Herzog, C. Alex Hartman, Philip A. M. Bachand

Abstract

Mercury pollution is widespread globally, and strategies for managing mercury contamination in aquatic environments are necessary. We tested whether coagulation with metal-based salts could remove mercury from wetland surface waters and decrease mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In a complete randomized block design, we constructed nine experimental wetlands in California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, stocked them with mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and then continuously applied agricultural drainage water that was either untreated (control), or treated with polyaluminum chloride or ferric sulfate coagulants. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations in surface waters were decreased by 62% and 63% in polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands and 50% and 76% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. Specifically, following coagulation, mercury was transferred from the filtered fraction of water into the particulate fraction of water which then settled within the wetland. Mosquitofish mercury concentrations were decreased by 35% in ferric sulfate treated wetlands compared to control wetlands. There was no reduction in mosquitofish mercury concentrations within the polyaluminum chloride treated wetlands, which may have been caused by production of bioavailable methylmercury within those wetlands. Coagulation may be an effective management strategy for reducing mercury contamination within wetlands, but further studies should explore potential effects on wetland ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 8%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 43 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 25%
Researcher 9 19%
Other 6 13%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 17%
Chemistry 5 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2015.
All research outputs
#7,480,343
of 14,483,684 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#10,064
of 14,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,137
of 229,920 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#118
of 252 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,483,684 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,920 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 252 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.