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Use of mechanical airway clearance devices in the home by people with neuromuscular disorders: effects on health service use and lifestyle benefits

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2015
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Title
Use of mechanical airway clearance devices in the home by people with neuromuscular disorders: effects on health service use and lifestyle benefits
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13023-015-0267-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Trinity Mahede, Geoff Davis, April Rutkay, Sarah Baxendale, Wenxing Sun, Hugh JS Dawkins, Caron Molster, Caroline E Graham

Abstract

People with neuromuscular disorders (NMD) exhibit weak coughs and are susceptible to recurrent chest infections and acute respiratory complications, the most frequent reasons for their unplanned hospital admissions. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) devices are a non-invasive method of increasing peak cough flow, improving cough efficacy, the clearance of secretion and overcoming atelectasis. There is limited published evidence on the impact of home use MI-E devices on health service utilisation. The aims of the study were: to assess the self-reported health and lifestyle benefits experienced as a result of home use of MI-E devices; and evaluate the effects of in-home use of MI-E devices, on Emergency Department (ED) presentations, hospital admissions and inpatient length of stay (LOS). Individuals with NMDwho were accessing a home MI-E device provided through Muscular Dystrophy Western Australia were invited to participate in a quantitative survey to obtain information on their experiences and self-assessed changes in respiratory health. An ad-hoc record linkage was performed to extract hospital, ED and mortality data from the DOHWA. The main outcome measures were ED presentations, hospital separations and LOS, before and after commencement of home use of an MI-E device. Thirty seven individuals with NMD using a MI-E device at home consented to participate in this study. The majority (73%) of participants reported using the MI-E device daily or weekly at home without medical assistance and 32% had used the machine to resolve a chocking episode. The survey highlighted benefits to respiratory function maintenance and the ability to manage increased health care needs at home. Not using a home MI-E device was associated with an increased risk of ED presentations (RR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.1-2.84). The number of hospital separations and LOS reduced after the use of MI-E device, but not significantly. No deaths were observed in participants using the MI-E device at home. Home use of a MI-E device by people living with NMD may have a potential impact on reducing their health service utilisation and risk of death. Future research with greater subject numbers and longer follow-up periods is recommended to enhance this field of study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 19%
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 16 28%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,214,155
of 5,064,898 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#778
of 866 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,730
of 157,865 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#40
of 47 outputs
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