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Metabolic changes in type 2 diabetes are reflected in peripheral blood cells, revealing aberrant cytotoxicity, a viral signature, and hypoxia inducible factor activity

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Metabolic changes in type 2 diabetes are reflected in peripheral blood cells, revealing aberrant cytotoxicity, a viral signature, and hypoxia inducible factor activity
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12920-015-0096-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tineke C. T. M. van der Pouw Kraan, Weena J. Chen, Mathijs C. M. Bunck, Daniel H. van Raalte, Nynke J. van der Zijl, Renate E. van Genugten, Liselotte van Bloemendaal, Josefien M. Baggen, Erik H. Serné, Michaela Diamant, Anton J. G. Horrevoets

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized by central obesity, insulin resistance, dysglycemia, and a pro-atherogenic plasma lipid profile. MetS creates a high risk for development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), presumably by altering inflammatory responses. Presently, it is unknown how the chronic metabolic disturbances in acute hyperglycemia, MetS and T2DM affect the immune activity of peripheral blood cells. We performed genome-wide expression analysis of peripheral blood cells obtained from patients with T2DM (n = 6) and age-, sex- , BMI- and blood pressure-matched obese individuals with MetS (n = 4) and lean healthy normoglycemic controls (n = 3), both under fasting conditions and after controlled induction of acute hyperglycemia during a 70 min hyperglycemic clamp. Differential gene expression during fasting conditions was confirmed by real-time PCR, for which we included additional age-, sex-, BMI-, and blood pressure-matched obese individuals with (n = 4) or without (n = 4) MetS. Pathway and Gene ontology analysis applied to baseline expression profiles of peripheral blood cells from MetS and T2DM patients revealed metabolic changes, highly similar to a reoviral infection gene signature in T2DM patients. Transcription factor binding site analysis indicated that increased HIF-1α activity, a transcription factor induced by either hypoxia or oxidative stress, is responsible for this aberrant metabolic profile in peripheral blood cells from T2DM patients. Acute hyperglycemia in healthy controls resulted in reduced expression of cytotoxicity-related genes, representing NK- and CD8(+) cells. In obese controls, MetS and especially T2DM patients, baseline expression of genes involved in cytotoxicity was already low, compared to healthy controls and did not further decrease upon acute hyperglycemia. The reduced activity of cytotoxic genes in T2DM is explained by chronic hyperglycemia, but its acute effects are restricted to healthy controls. Genome expression of circulating leukocytes from T2DM patients differs from MetS individuals by a specific reovirus signature. Our data thus suggest a role for suppressed anti-viral capacity in the etiology of diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,367,276
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#106
of 1,014 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,159
of 240,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,014 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,407 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them