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Changes in glycoprotein expression between primary breast tumour and synchronous lymph node metastases or asynchronous distant metastases

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Proteomics, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in glycoprotein expression between primary breast tumour and synchronous lymph node metastases or asynchronous distant metastases
Published in
Clinical Proteomics, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12014-015-9084-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emila Kurbasic, Martin Sjöström, Morten Krogh, Elin Folkesson, Dorthe Grabau, Karin Hansson, Lisa Rydén, Sofia Waldemarson, Peter James, Emma Niméus

Abstract

Breast cancer is a very heterogeneous disease and some patients are cured by the surgical removal of the primary tumour whilst other patients suffer from metastasis and spreading of the disease, despite adjuvant therapy. A number of prognostic and treatment predictive factors have been identified such as tumour size, oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) status, histological grade, Ki67 and age. Lymph node involvement is also assessed during surgery to determine if the tumour has spread which requires dissection of the axilla and adjuvant treatment. The prognostic and treatment predictive factors assessing the nature of the tumour are all routinely based on the status of the primary tumour. We have analysed a unique tumour set of fourteen primary breast cancer tumours with matched synchronous axillary lymph node metastases and a set of nine primary tumours with, later developed, matched distant metastases from different sites in the body. We used a pairwise tumour analysis (from the same individual) since the difference between the same tumour-type in different patients was greater. Glycopeptide capture was used in this study to selectively isolate and quantify N-linked glycopeptides from tumours mixtures and the captured glycopeptides were subjected to label-free quantitative tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Differentially expressed proteins between primary tumours and matched lymph node metastasis and distant metastasis were identified. Two of the top hits, ATPIF1 and tubulin β-chain were validated by immunohistochemistry to be differentially regulated. We show that the expression of a large number of glycosylated proteins change between primary tumours and matched lymph node metastases and distant metastases, confirming that cancer cells undergo a molecular transformation during the spread to a secondary site. The proteins are part of important pathways such as cell adhesion, migration pathways and immune response giving insight into molecular changes needed for the tumour to spread. The large difference between primary tumours and lymph node and distant metastases also suggest that treatment should be based on the phenotype of the lymph node and distant metastases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 7%
Unknown 13 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 43%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 29%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2015.
All research outputs
#7,044,031
of 12,480,234 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Proteomics
#65
of 156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,523
of 228,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Proteomics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,480,234 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them