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The endogenous molecular clock orchestrates the temporal separation of substrate metabolism in skeletal muscle

Overview of attention for article published in Skeletal Muscle, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 290)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
88 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
4 Redditors

Citations

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71 Dimensions

Readers on

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89 Mendeley
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Title
The endogenous molecular clock orchestrates the temporal separation of substrate metabolism in skeletal muscle
Published in
Skeletal Muscle, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13395-015-0039-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian A Hodge, Yuan Wen, Lance A Riley, Xiping Zhang, Jonathan H England, Brianna D Harfmann, Elizabeth A Schroder, Karyn A Esser

Abstract

Skeletal muscle is a major contributor to whole-body metabolism as it serves as a depot for both glucose and amino acids, and is a highly metabolically active tissue. Within skeletal muscle exists an intrinsic molecular clock mechanism that regulates the timing of physiological processes. A key function of the clock is to regulate the timing of metabolic processes to anticipate time of day changes in environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to identify metabolic genes that are expressed in a circadian manner and determine if these genes are regulated downstream of the intrinsic molecular clock by assaying gene expression in an inducible skeletal muscle-specific Bmal1 knockout mouse model (iMS-Bmal1 (-/-) ). We used circadian statistics to analyze a publicly available, high-resolution time-course skeletal muscle expression dataset. Gene ontology analysis was utilized to identify enriched biological processes in the skeletal muscle circadian transcriptome. We generated a tamoxifen-inducible skeletal muscle-specific Bmal1 knockout mouse model and performed a time-course microarray experiment to identify gene expression changes downstream of the molecular clock. Wheel activity monitoring was used to assess circadian behavioral rhythms in iMS-Bmal1 (-/-) and control iMS-Bmal1 (+/+) mice. The skeletal muscle circadian transcriptome was highly enriched for metabolic processes. Acrophase analysis of circadian metabolic genes revealed a temporal separation of genes involved in substrate utilization and storage over a 24-h period. A number of circadian metabolic genes were differentially expressed in the skeletal muscle of the iMS-Bmal1 (-/-) mice. The iMS-Bmal1 (-/-) mice displayed circadian behavioral rhythms indistinguishable from iMS-Bmal1 (+/+) mice. We also observed a gene signature indicative of a fast to slow fiber-type shift and a more oxidative skeletal muscle in the iMS-Bmal1 (-/-) model. These data provide evidence that the intrinsic molecular clock in skeletal muscle temporally regulates genes involved in the utilization and storage of substrates independent of circadian activity. Disruption of this mechanism caused by phase shifts (that is, social jetlag) or night eating may ultimately diminish skeletal muscle's ability to efficiently maintain metabolic homeostasis over a 24-h period.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 88 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 84 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 22 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 19%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Student > Master 9 10%
Other 6 7%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 10%
Sports and Recreations 6 7%
Engineering 4 4%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 11 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2019.
All research outputs
#296,617
of 15,762,831 outputs
Outputs from Skeletal Muscle
#3
of 290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,335
of 233,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Skeletal Muscle
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,762,831 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 290 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them