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Chromosomal instability as a prognostic marker in cervical cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Chromosomal instability as a prognostic marker in cervical cancer
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1372-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine How, Jeff Bruce, Jonathan So, Melania Pintilie, Benjamin Haibe-Kains, Angela Hui, Blaise A Clarke, David W Hedley, Richard P Hill, Michael Milosevic, Anthony Fyles, Fei-Fei Liu

Abstract

Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women globally, and despite treatment, distant metastasis and nodal recurrence will still develop in approximately 30% of patients. The ability to predict which patients are likely to experience distant relapse would allow clinicians to better tailor treatment. Previous studies have investigated the role of chromosomal instability (CIN) in cancer, which can promote tumour initiation and growth; a hallmark of human malignancies. In this study, we sought to examine the published CIN70 gene signature in a cohort of cervical cancer patients treated at the Princess Margaret (PM) Cancer Centre and an independent cohort of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) cervical cancer patients, to determine if this CIN signature associated with patient outcome. Cervical cancer samples were collected from 79 patients, treated between 2000-2007 at the PM, prior to undergoing curative chemo-radiation. Total RNA was extracted from each patient sample and analyzed using the GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array (Affymetrix). High CIN70 scores were significantly related to increased chromosomal alterations in TCGA cervical cancer patients, including a higher percentage of genome altered and a higher number of copy number alterations. In addition, this same CIN70 signature was shown to be predictive of para-aortic nodal relapse in the PM Cancer Centre cohort. These findings demonstrate that chromosomal instability plays an important role in cervical cancer, and is significantly associated with patient outcome. For the first time, this CIN70 gene signature provided prognostic value for patients with cervical cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 16%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Other 5 20%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Unspecified 2 8%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,897,947
of 5,452,879 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,250
of 2,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,235
of 175,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#106
of 197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,452,879 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,901 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,774 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.