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Qualitative Exploration of an Effective Depression Literacy Fotonovela with at Risk Latina Immigrants

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Community Psychology, May 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

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4 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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Title
Qualitative Exploration of an Effective Depression Literacy Fotonovela with at Risk Latina Immigrants
Published in
American Journal of Community Psychology, May 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10464-015-9729-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Y. Hernandez, Kurt C. Organista

Abstract

While depression is prevalent among immigrant Latinas, mental health literacy is low. Culturally tailored health narratives can improve mental health literacy and are now increasingly featured in Spanish language fotonovelas (i.e., booklets in a comic book format with posed photographs and dialogue bubbles). The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore why a depression literacy fotonovela proved effective with Latina immigrants at risk for depression in a quantitative randomized control study. This study is the qualitative companion of the previously published quantitative piece of a mixed methods study, the latter revealing posttest improvements in depression knowledge, self-efficacy to identify the need for treatment, and decreased stigma towards mental health care (Hernandez and Organista in Am J Community Psychol 2013. doi: 10.1007/s10464-013-9587-1 ). Twenty-five immigrant Latinas participated in structured interviews, in the current qualitative study, 3 weeks after participating in the quantitative study. Results suggest depression literacy improved because participants evidenced high recall of the storyline and characters, which they also found appealing (e.g., liked peer and professional support offered to depressed main character). Further, identification with the main character was reflected in participants recalling similar circumstances impacting their mental health. Despite some improvement, stigma related to depression and its treatment remained for some women. Future research for the improvement of health literacy tools is discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 93 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Researcher 5 5%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 33 35%
Social Sciences 17 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 20 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2017.
All research outputs
#3,537,499
of 12,319,016 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Community Psychology
#230
of 729 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,754
of 236,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Community Psychology
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,319,016 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 729 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.