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Varicella zoster virus productively infects human natural killer cells and manipulates phenotype

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Pathogens, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
29 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
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Title
Varicella zoster virus productively infects human natural killer cells and manipulates phenotype
Published in
PLoS Pathogens, April 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006999
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tessa Mollie Campbell, Brian Patrick McSharry, Megan Steain, Thomas Myles Ashhurst, Barry Slobedman, Allison Abendroth

Abstract

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous human alphaherpesvirus, responsible for varicella upon primary infection and herpes zoster following reactivation from latency. To establish lifelong infection, VZV employs strategies to evade and manipulate the immune system to its advantage in disseminating virus. As innate lymphocytes, natural killer (NK) cells are part of the early immune response to infection, and have been implicated in controlling VZV infection in patients. Understanding of how VZV directly interacts with NK cells, however, has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we provide the first evidence that VZV is capable of infecting human NK cells from peripheral blood in vitro. VZV infection of NK cells is productive, supporting the full kinetic cascade of viral gene expression and producing new infectious virus which was transmitted to epithelial cells in culture. We determined by flow cytometry that NK cell infection with VZV was not only preferential for the mature CD56dim NK cell subset, but also drove acquisition of the terminally-differentiated maturity marker CD57. Interpretation of high dimensional flow cytometry data with tSNE analysis revealed that culture of NK cells with VZV also induced a potent loss of expression of the low-affinity IgG Fc receptor CD16 on the cell surface. Notably, VZV infection of NK cells upregulated surface expression of chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to the skin -a crucial site in VZV disease where highly infectious lesions develop. We demonstrate that VZV actively manipulates the NK cell phenotype through productive infection, and propose a potential role for NK cells in VZV pathogenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 8 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 6 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 12%
Unspecified 1 4%
Unknown 11 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2020.
All research outputs
#1,060,802
of 18,496,698 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Pathogens
#1,203
of 7,725 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,249
of 287,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Pathogens
#32
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,496,698 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,725 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,843 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.