↓ Skip to main content

Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology Resources, June 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing
Published in
Molecular Ecology Resources, June 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1755-0998.2011.03033.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. N. JENNINGS, B. J. KNAUS, T. D. MULLINS, S. M. HAIG, R. C. CRONN

Abstract

Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 2%
United States 4 2%
Portugal 3 2%
Canada 2 1%
Australia 2 1%
Austria 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 10 6%
Unknown 135 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 45 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 24%
Student > Master 25 15%
Professor 13 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 6%
Other 32 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 136 83%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 7%
Unspecified 6 4%
Environmental Science 3 2%
Physics and Astronomy 2 1%
Other 5 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2011.
All research outputs
#3,182,698
of 12,543,614 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology Resources
#425
of 895 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,577
of 96,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology Resources
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,543,614 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 895 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 96,049 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.