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Docosahexaenoic acid and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children: a novel approach?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Docosahexaenoic acid and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children: a novel approach?
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0471-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elvira Verduci, Carlotta Lassandro, Giovanni Radaelli, Laura Soldati

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents the most common chronic liver disease in obese children of industrialized countries. Nowadays the first line of treatment of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is based on dietary and lifestyle intervention; however compliance to these interventions is very difficult to maintain in long term period. This editorial discusses about docosahexaenoic acid treatment as possible novel approach for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese children. Docosahexaenoic acid may modulate the inflammatory response, improve insulin sensitivity and could be effective in enhancing intestinal barrier integrity, essential to protect a healthy gut-liver axis. Indeed alteration of gut microbiota composition and increased intestinal permeability may rise the exposure of liver to gut-derived bacterial products, causing activation of signalling pathways implicated in liver inflammation and fibrogenesis. This mechanism has been observed in vitro and animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease but also in a clinical study in adults. While evidence suggests that n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation may decrease liver fat in adults, in pediatric population only a study examined this topic. In obese children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease well designed randomized controlled trials are needed to better clarify the possible efficacy of docosahexaenoic acid treatment, and underlying mechanisms, to identify the optimal required dose and to evaluate if the docosahexaenoic acid effect is limited to the duration of the treatment or it may continue after the end of treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 12 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Sports and Recreations 3 5%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 12 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2015.
All research outputs
#15,391,100
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,669
of 3,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,579
of 244,007 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,007 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them