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MeCP2 Plays an Analgesic Role in Pain Transmission through Regulating CREB / miR-132 Pathway

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, April 2015
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2 tweeters

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41 Mendeley
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Title
MeCP2 Plays an Analgesic Role in Pain Transmission through Regulating CREB / miR-132 Pathway
Published in
Molecular Pain, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0015-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ran Zhang, Min Huang, Zhijuan Cao, Jieyu Qi, Zilong Qiu, Li-Yang Chiang

Abstract

The Methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MeCP2 gene) encodes a critical transcriptional repressor and is widely expressed in mammalian neurons. MeCP2 plays a critical role in neuronal differentiation, neural development, and synaptic plasticity. Mutations and duplications of the human MECP2 gene lead to severe neurodevelopmental disorders, such as Rett syndrome and autism. In this study we investigate the role of MeCP2 in the spinal cord and found that MeCP2 plays an important role as an analgesic mediator in pain circuitry. Experiments using MeCP2 transgenic mice showed that overexpression of MeCP2 weakens both acute mechanical pain and thermal pain, suggesting an analgesic role of MeCP2 in acute pain transduction. We found that through p-CREB/miR-132 signaling cascade is involved in MeCP2-mediated pain transduction. We also examined the role of MeCP2 in chronic pain formation using spared nerve injury (SNI) model. Strikingly, we found that development of neuropathic pain attenuates in MeCP2 transgenic mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice. Our study shows that MeCP2 plays an analgesic role in both acute pain transduction and chronic pain formation through regulating CREB-miR-132 pathway. This work provides a potential therapeutic target for neural pathologic pain, and also sheds new lights on the abnormal sensory mechanisms associated with autism spectrum orders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
Unknown 39 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 22%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Master 6 15%
Other 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 5 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 27%
Neuroscience 7 17%
Psychology 6 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 7%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2016.
All research outputs
#9,636,162
of 12,552,259 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#305
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,607
of 231,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,259 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,967 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.