↓ Skip to main content

Coverage, use and maintenance of bed nets and related influence factors in Kachin Special Region II, northeastern Myanmar

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, May 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Coverage, use and maintenance of bed nets and related influence factors in Kachin Special Region II, northeastern Myanmar
Published in
Malaria Journal, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0727-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hui Liu, Jian-wei Xu, Xiang-rui Guo, Joshua Havumaki, Ying-xue Lin, Guo-cui Yu, Dai-li Zhou

Abstract

Myanmar is one of the 31 highest burden malaria countries worldwide. Scaling up the appropriate use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) is a national policy for malaria prevention and control. However, the data on use, influencing factors and maintenance of bed nets is still lack among the population in Kachin Special Region II, Northeastern Myanmar. The study combined a quantitative household questionnaire survey and qualitative direct observation of households. A Chi-squared test was used to compare the percentages of ownership, coverage, and rates of use of bed nets. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression analysis (MVLRA) was used to analyse factors that influence the use of bed nets. Finally, covariance compared the mean calibrated hole indexes (MCHI) across potential influence variables. The bed net to person ratio was 1:1.96 (i.e., more than one net for every two people). The long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) to person ratio was 1: 2.52. Also, the percentage of households that owned at least one bed net was 99.7 % (666/688). Some 3262 (97.3 %) residents slept under bed nets the prior night, 2551 (76.1 %) of which slept under ITNs/LLINs the prior night (SUITNPN). The poorest families, those with thatched roofing, those who use agriculture as their main source of family income, household heads who knew that mosquitoes transmit malaria and those who used bed nets to prevent malaria, were significantly more likely to be in the SUITNPN group. However, residents in lowlands, and foothills were significantly less likely to be SUITNPNs. Finally, head of household attitude towards fixing bed nets influenced MCHI (F = 8.09, P = 0.0046). The coverage and usage rates of bed nets were high, especially among children, and pregnant women. Family wealth index, geographical zones, household roofing, source of family income, household head's knowledge of malaria transmission and of using bed nets as tools for malaria prevention are all independent factors which influence use of ITNs/LLINs in KR2. Maintaining high coverage, and use rate of bed nets should be a priority for the war-torn population of KR2 to ensure equity and human rights.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Malawi 1 2%
Ghana 1 2%
Unknown 63 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 21%
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 5 8%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 33%
Social Sciences 10 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,487,328
of 5,141,491 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,142
of 2,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,730
of 171,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#73
of 119 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,141,491 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,049 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,876 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 119 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.