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Anaerobic Chemolithotrophic Growth of the Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Strain MLMS-1 by Disproportionation of Monothioarsenate

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, May 2015
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Title
Anaerobic Chemolithotrophic Growth of the Haloalkaliphilic Bacterium Strain MLMS-1 by Disproportionation of Monothioarsenate
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, May 2015
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b01165
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Planer-Friedrich, C. Härtig, R. Lohmayer, E. Suess, S. H. McCann, R. Oremland

Abstract

A novel chemolithotrophic metabolism based on a mixed arsenic-sulfur species has been discovered for the anaerobic deltaproteobacterium, strain MLMS-1, a haloalkaliphile isolated from Mono Lake, California, USA. Strain MLMS-1 is the first reported obligate arsenate-respiring chemoautotroph which grows by coupling arsenate reduction to arsenite with the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In that pathway the formation of a mixed arsenic-sulfur species was reported. That species was assumed to be monothioarsenite ([H2AsIIIS-IIO2]-), formed as an intermediate by abiotic reaction of arsenite with sulfide. We now report that this species is monothioarsenate ([HAsVS-IIO3]2-) as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Monothioarsenate forms by abiotic reaction of arsenite with zero-valent sulfur. Monothioarsenate is kinetically stable under a wide range of pH and redox conditions. However, it was metabolized rapidly by strain MLMS-1 when incubated with arsenate. Incubations using monothioarsenate confirmed that strain MLMS-1 was able to grow (µ = 0.017 h-1) on this substrate via a disproportionation reaction by oxidizing the thio-group-sulfur (S-II) to zero-valent sulfur or sulfate while concurrently reducing the central arsenic atom (AsV) to arsenite. Monothioarsenate disproportionation could be widespread in nature beyond the already studied arsenic and sulfide rich hot springs and soda lakes where it was discovered.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 4%
Mexico 1 4%
Austria 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 24 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 29%
Student > Master 5 18%
Unspecified 4 14%
Researcher 4 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Other 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 25%
Unspecified 5 18%
Environmental Science 4 14%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2015.
All research outputs
#9,833,810
of 12,313,065 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#11,030
of 12,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,152
of 236,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#206
of 260 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,985 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 260 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.