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Adult Mortality Probability and Nest Predation Rates Explain Parental Effort in Warming Eggs with Consequences for Embryonic Development Time

Overview of attention for article published in The American Naturalist, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
Adult Mortality Probability and Nest Predation Rates Explain Parental Effort in Warming Eggs with Consequences for Embryonic Development Time
Published in
The American Naturalist, August 2015
DOI 10.1086/681986
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas E. Martin, Juan C. Oteyza, Andy J. Boyce, Penn Lloyd, Riccardo Ton

Abstract

Parental behavior and effort vary extensively among species. Life-history theory suggests that age-specific mortality could cause this interspecific variation, but past tests have focused on fecundity as the measure of parental effort. Fecundity can cause costs of reproduction that confuse whether mortality is the cause or the consequence of parental effort. We focus on a trait, parental allocation of time and effort in warming embryos, that varies widely among species of diverse taxa and is not tied to fecundity. We conducted studies on songbirds of four continents and show that time spent warming eggs varies widely among species and latitudes and is not correlated with clutch size. Adult and offspring (nest) mortality explained most of the interspecific variation in time and effort that parents spend warming eggs, measured by average egg temperatures. Parental effort in warming eggs is important because embryonic temperature can influence embryonic development period and hence exposure time to predation risk. We show through correlative evidence and experimental swapping of embryos between species that parentally induced egg temperatures cause interspecific variation in embryonic development period. The strong association of age-specific mortality with parental effort in warming eggs and the subsequent effects on embryonic development time are unique results that can advance understanding of broad geographic patterns of life-history variation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 4%
United States 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Unknown 70 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 25%
Student > Master 15 20%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 81%
Environmental Science 7 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 1%
Unknown 6 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#533,725
of 15,090,804 outputs
Outputs from The American Naturalist
#170
of 3,088 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,465
of 235,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The American Naturalist
#4
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,090,804 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,088 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,736 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.