↓ Skip to main content

Infection by Haemoproteus Parasites in Four Species of Frigatebirds and the Description of a New Species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Parasitology, April 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Infection by Haemoproteus Parasites in Four Species of Frigatebirds and the Description of a New Species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida: Haemoproteidae)
Published in
Journal of Parasitology, April 2012
DOI 10.1645/ge-2415.1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Santiago Merino, Janos Hennicke, Javier Martínez, Katrin Ludynia, Roxana Torres, Thierry M. Work, Stedson Stroud, Juan F. Masello, Petra Quillfeldt

Abstract

Among seabirds, the fregatids stand out with a high prevalence of blood parasites. Four of 5 species in this family have been found to be infected with Haemoproteus; however, complete species descriptions with molecular phylogeny are lacking. Seventy-five samples from 4 species of frigatebirds, i.e., Fregata andrewsi, Fregata minor, Fregata magnificens, and Fregata aquila, were screened for infections caused by species of Haemoproteus. Four different parasite haplotypes were found infecting frigatebirds based on the sequencing of a fragment of the cytochrome b gene. Two haplotypes belong to the subgenus Parahaemoproteus, and the other 2 correspond to haplotypes within the subgenus Haemoproteus . The more prevalent and cosmopolitan Parahaemoproteus haplotype (FregPHae1) was phylogenetically grouped with other Haemoproteus parasites infecting non-passerine birds, but it could not be detected from the single sample from F. aquila. The other Parahaemoproteus haplotype (FregPHae2) was not phylogenetically clustered with parasites infecting non-passerine birds, and it was sequenced from a single (1 each) F. andrewsi and F. minor. Blood smears from F. andrewsi infected only by FregPHae1 haplotype showed sufficient gametocytes to allow description of a new species, Haemoproteus valkiūnasi sp. nov. In contrast to Haemoproteus iwa, the only previously known blood parasite infecting frigatebirds and described from F. minor from Galapagos Islands, parasites from F. andrewsi (1) are shorter with no contact of gametocyte with host cell membrane, (2) have fewer pigment granules, and (3) have wider microgametocytes, with a smaller host nuclear displacement. In contrast, patent single infections corresponding to the cosmopolitan haplotype of the subgenus Haemoproteus (FregHae1) were also found in samples from 1 F. andrewsi, 1 F. minor, and 1 F. aquila. In all these cases, the number of microgametocytes was very low, resembling H. iwa, which lacks microgametocytes in the original description. Macrogametocytes of haplotype FregHae1 in F. andrewsi differ significantly from all the characteristics measured from H. valkiūnasi. In addition, it also differs from all characteristics of H. iwa despite being genetically identical in the analyzed fragment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Lithuania 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 70 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 22%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Unspecified 5 7%
Other 20 27%
Unknown 1 1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 58%
Environmental Science 9 12%
Unspecified 7 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 1 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,635,318
of 13,149,092 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Parasitology
#280
of 1,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,469
of 97,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Parasitology
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,149,092 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,896 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 97,248 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.