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What predicts emotional response in men awaiting prostate biopsy?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Urology, April 2018
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Title
What predicts emotional response in men awaiting prostate biopsy?
Published in
BMC Urology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12894-018-0340-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

AnnMarie Groarke, Ruth Curtis, Deirdre M. J. Walsh, Francis J. Sullivan

Abstract

Incidence of prostate cancer is increasing as opportunistic screening becomes widespread and life expectancy rises. Despite screening availability, research reveals conflicting results on medical outcomes, for example, disease specific mortality. However the gold standard in early diagnosis of potentially curable organ confined prostate cancer is transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic prostate biopsy (TRUS-BX). While focus has been given to medical sequalae there is a paucity of research on the psychological impact of biopsy. Awaiting biopsy may be inherently stressful but no studies to date, have assessed men's perception of stress and its impact on emotional response. This study, therefore, examines the role of stress and also personal resources namely, self-efficacy and sense of coherence in emotional adjustment in men awaiting a prostate biopsy. Men attending a Rapid Access Prostate Cancer Clinic for a transrectal prostate biopsy (N = 114) participated in the study. They completed self report questionnaires on perceived stress (PSS), generalised self-efficacy (GSES), and sense of coherence (SOC). Adjustment was measured by the Profile of Mood States (POMS-B) which assesses tension, depression, anger, fatigue, confusion and vigour. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that the set of predictors accounted for 17%-34% of variance across six mood states and predicted 46% of total mood disturbance. Perceived stress explained variance on all domains (11%-26%) with high stress linked to poor functioning. Perceived stress was the strongest and most consistent predictor of emotional adjustment. This is an important finding as stress appraisal has not been examined previously in this context and suggests that stress management is an important target to enhance emotional wellbeing of men attending for a prostate biopsy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 29%
Psychology 6 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 9 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,081,425
of 12,886,920 outputs
Outputs from BMC Urology
#171
of 330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,078
of 269,133 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Urology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,886,920 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 330 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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