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Mapping the Drivers of Climate Change Vulnerability for Australia’s Threatened Species

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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42 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Mapping the Drivers of Climate Change Vulnerability for Australia’s Threatened Species
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0124766
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jasmine R. Lee, Ramona Maggini, Martin F. J. Taylor, Richard A. Fuller

Abstract

Effective conservation management for climate adaptation rests on understanding the factors driving species' vulnerability in a spatially explicit manner so as to direct on-ground action. However, there have been only few attempts to map the spatial distribution of the factors driving vulnerability to climate change. Here we conduct a species-level assessment of climate change vulnerability for a sample of Australia's threatened species and map the distribution of species affected by each factor driving climate change vulnerability across the continent. Almost half of the threatened species assessed were considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change: amphibians being the most vulnerable group, followed by plants, reptiles, mammals and birds. Species with more restricted distributions were more likely to show high climate change vulnerability than widespread species. The main factors driving climate change vulnerability were low genetic variation, dependence on a particular disturbance regime and reliance on a particular moisture regime or habitat. The geographic distribution of the species impacted by each driver varies markedly across the continent, for example species impacted by low genetic variation are prevalent across the human-dominated south-east of the country, while reliance on particular moisture regimes is prevalent across northern Australia. Our results show that actions to address climate adaptation will need to be spatially appropriate, and that in some regions a complex suite of factors driving climate change vulnerability will need to be addressed. Taxonomic and geographic variation in the factors driving climate change vulnerability highlights an urgent need for a spatial prioritisation of climate adaptation actions for threatened species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 5%
Australia 2 3%
Finland 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 52 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 6 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 31 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 34%
Unspecified 3 5%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 2%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2016.
All research outputs
#504,520
of 12,016,938 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#9,736
of 131,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,977
of 230,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#418
of 6,162 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,016,938 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 131,527 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,162 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.