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Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone reduce platelet activation and reactivity in older men and women

Overview of attention for article published in Aging, May 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone reduce platelet activation and reactivity in older men and women
Published in
Aging, May 2018
DOI 10.18632/aging.101438
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kamil Karolczak, Lucyna Konieczna, Tomasz Kostka, Piotr J. Witas, Bartlomiej Soltysik, Tomasz Baczek, Cezary Watala

Abstract

The cardiovascular effects of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are generally attributed to their modulatory action on lipid and glucose metabolism. However, no ex vivo studies suggest that circulating androgen levels influence the activation and reactivity of blood platelets - one of the main components of the haemostasis system directly involved in atherosclerosis. The levels of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and oestradiol in plasma from men and women aged from 60 to 65 years were measured by LC-MS; the aim was to identify any potential relationships between sex steroid levels and the markers of platelet activation (surface membrane expression of GPII/IIIa complex and P-selectin) and platelet reactivity in response to arachidonate, collagen or ADP, monitored with whole blood aggregometry and flow cytometry. The results of the ex vivo part of the study indicate that the concentrations of testosterone and its reduced form, dihydrotestosterone are significantly negatively associated with platelet activation and reactivity. These observations were confirmed in an in vitro model: testosterone and dihydrotestosterone significantly inhibited platelet aggregation triggered by arachidonate or collagen. Our findings indicate that testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are significant haemostatic steroids with inhibitory action on blood platelets in older people.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Other 4 25%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Physics and Astronomy 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2020.
All research outputs
#9,820,583
of 16,649,395 outputs
Outputs from Aging
#862
of 2,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,675
of 281,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Aging
#17
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,649,395 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,212 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,769 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.