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Snail-borne parasitic diseases: an update on global epidemiological distribution, transmission interruption and control methods

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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107 Mendeley
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Title
Snail-borne parasitic diseases: an update on global epidemiological distribution, transmission interruption and control methods
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40249-018-0414-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiao-Ting Lu, Qiu-Yun Gu, Yanin Limpanont, Lan-Gui Song, Zhong-Dao Wu, Kamolnetr Okanurak, Zhi-Yue Lv

Abstract

Snail-borne parasitic diseases, such as angiostrongyliasis, clonorchiasis, fascioliasis, fasciolopsiasis, opisthorchiasis, paragonimiasis and schistosomiasis, pose risks to human health and cause major socioeconomic problems in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. In this review we summarize the core roles of snails in the life cycles of the parasites they host, their clinical manifestations and disease distributions, as well as snail control methods. Snails have four roles in the life cycles of the parasites they host: as an intermediate host infected by the first-stage larvae, as the only intermediate host infected by miracidia, as the first intermediate host that ingests the parasite eggs are ingested, and as the first intermediate host penetrated by miracidia with or without the second intermediate host being an aquatic animal. Snail-borne parasitic diseases target many organs, such as the lungs, liver, biliary tract, intestines, brain and kidneys, leading to overactive immune responses, cancers, organ failure, infertility and even death. Developing countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America have the highest incidences of these diseases, while some endemic parasites have developed into worldwide epidemics through the global spread of snails. Physical, chemical and biological methods have been introduced to control the host snail populations to prevent disease. In this review, we summarize the roles of snails in the life cycles of the parasites they host, the worldwide distribution of parasite-transmitting snails, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of snail-transmitted parasitic diseases, and the existing snail control measures, which will contribute to further understanding the snail-parasite relationship and new strategies for controlling snail-borne parasitic diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 107 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 19%
Student > Master 20 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 11 10%
Environmental Science 8 7%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 21 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,913,185
of 15,226,555 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#82
of 556 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,678
of 277,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,226,555 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 556 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them