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Need satisfaction, motivational regulations and exercise: moderation and mediation effects

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Need satisfaction, motivational regulations and exercise: moderation and mediation effects
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0226-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karin Weman-Josefsson, Magnus Lindwall, Andreas Ivarsson

Abstract

Based on the Self-determination theory process model, this study aimed to explore relationships between the latent constructs of psychological need satisfaction, autonomous motivation and exercise behaviour; the mediational role of autonomous motivation in the association of psychological need satisfaction with exercise behaviour; as well as gender and age differences in the aforementioned associations. Adult active members of an Internet-based exercise program (n = 1091) between 18 and 78 years of age completed a test battery on motivational aspects based on Self-determination theory. The Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale and the Behavioural Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2 were used to measure need satisfaction and type of motivation and the Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire to measure self-reported exercise. Need satisfaction predicted autonomous motivation, which in turn predicted exercise, especially for women. Autonomous motivation was found to mediate the association between need satisfaction and exercise. Age and gender moderated several of the paths in the model linking need satisfaction with motivation and exercise. The results demonstrated gender and age differences in the proposed sequential mechanisms between autonomous motivation and exercise in the process model. This study thus highlights a potential value in considering moderating factors and the need to further examine the underlying mechanisms between needs, autonomous motivation, and exercise behaviour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 106 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 24%
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 16%
Researcher 10 9%
Unspecified 9 8%
Other 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 33%
Sports and Recreations 20 19%
Unspecified 16 15%
Social Sciences 11 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 6%
Other 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,455,912
of 11,005,397 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#809
of 1,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,570
of 225,998 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#42
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,005,397 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,186 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.3. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,998 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.