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The effect of age on muscle characteristics of the abductor hallucis in people with hallux valgus: a cross-sectional observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page
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1 Google+ user

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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31 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of age on muscle characteristics of the abductor hallucis in people with hallux valgus: a cross-sectional observational study
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13047-015-0078-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ashok Aiyer, Sarah Stewart, Keith Rome

Abstract

The abductor hallucis muscle plays an important role in maintaining alignment of the first metatarsophalangeal joint. The aims of this study were (1) to determine differences in abductor hallucis muscle characteristics in people with hallux valgus between three age groups (20-44 years, 45-64 years, and 65+ years); and (2) to determine the association between age and abductor hallucis size and quality. Characteristics of the abductor hallucis muscle were measured in 96 feet with hallux valgus using musculoskeletal ultrasound. Muscle characteristics included width, thickness, cross-sectional area and echo-intensity. A one-way ANCOVA was conducted to compare the mean muscle characteristic values between the three age groups while adjusting for hallux valgus severity as a covariate. A Bonferroni post-hoc was used to adjust for multiple testing (p < 0.0167). Spearman's rho correlation coefficient was used to determine the association between age and the abductor hallucis muscle parameters. There was a significant difference in dorso-plantar thickness (p = 0.003) and cross-sectional area (p = 0.008) between the three age groups. The Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference in mean thickness and mean cross-sectional area between the 20-44 age group (p = 0.003) and the 65+ age group (p = 0.006). No significant differences were noted between the three age groups for medio-lateral width (p > 0.05) or echo-intensity (p > 0.05). Increasing age was significantly associated with a reduction in dorso-plantar thickness (r = -0.27, p = 0.008) and cross-sectional area (r = -0.24, p = 0.019) but with small effect sizes. There was no significant correlation between age and medio-lateral width (r = -0.51, p = 0.142) or echo intensity (r =0.138, p =0.179). Increasing age is associated with a greater reduction in size of the abductor hallucis muscle in people with hallux valgus. People over the age of 65 years old with hallux valgus display a significant reduction in abductor hallucis muscle size compared to those aged less than 45 years old. This is consistent with age-related changes to skeletal muscle.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Master 4 13%
Unspecified 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 10 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 26%
Unspecified 5 16%
Sports and Recreations 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2015.
All research outputs
#1,996,127
of 11,889,913 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#191
of 479 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,788
of 229,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#6
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,889,913 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 479 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,621 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.