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Unintended Consequences of Management Actions in Salt Pond Restoration: Cascading Effects in Trophic Interactions

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, June 2015
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3 tweeters

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Unintended Consequences of Management Actions in Salt Pond Restoration: Cascading Effects in Trophic Interactions
Published in
PLOS ONE, June 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0119345
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Y. Takekawa, Joshua T. Ackerman, L. Arriana Brand, Tanya R. Graham, Collin A. Eagles-Smith, Mark P. Herzog, Brent R. Topping, Gregory G. Shellenbarger, James S. Kuwabara, Eric Mruz, Sara L. Piotter, Nicole D. Athearn

Abstract

Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO) event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus), and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri). Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction of water quality and trophic structure when managing restoration of salt ponds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 20%
Student > Master 6 13%
Lecturer 2 4%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 31%
Environmental Science 11 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2015.
All research outputs
#12,733,214
of 20,585,915 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#101,213
of 177,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,191
of 249,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#3,442
of 6,320 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,585,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,676 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,138 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6,320 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.