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Longitudinal mentorship to support the development of medical students’ future professional role: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, June 2015
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Title
Longitudinal mentorship to support the development of medical students’ future professional role: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Medical Education, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12909-015-0383-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanne Kalén, Sari Ponzer, Astrid Seeberger, Anna Kiessling, Charlotte Silén

Abstract

Mentoring has been employed in medical education in recent years, but there is extensive variation in the published literature concerning the goals of mentoring and the role of the mentor. Therefore, there is still a need for a deeper understanding of the meaning of mentoring for medical students' learning and development. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore how formal and longitudinal mentoring can contribute to medical students' professional development. Sixteen medical students at a Swedish university were interviewed individually about their experiences of combined group and one-to-one mentoring that is given throughout their studies. The mentoring programme was focused on the non-medical skills of the profession and used CanMEDS roles of a physician for students' self-assessment. Data were analysed using a latent, interpretive approach to content analysis. The results comprise three themes: Integrating oneself with one's future role as a physician, Experiencing clinical reality with the mentor creates incentives to learn and Towards understanding the professional competence of a physician. The mentorship enabled the students to create a view of their future professional role and to integrate it with their own personalities. The students' understanding of professional competence and behaviour evolved during the mentorship and they made advances towards understanding the wholeness of the profession. This approach to mentorship supported different components of the students' professional development; the themes Integrating oneself with one's future role and Towards understanding the professional competence of a physician can be regarded as two parallel processes, while the third theme, Experiencing clinical reality with the mentor creates incentives to learn, promotes these processes. Formalized and longitudinal mentoring focusing on the non-medical skills can be recommended to help medical students to integrate their professional role with themselves as individuals and promote understanding of professional competence in the process of becoming a physician.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Pakistan 1 1%
France 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 64 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 18%
Student > Master 8 12%
Lecturer 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 24 35%
Unknown 8 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 51%
Social Sciences 8 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2015.
All research outputs
#3,643,241
of 5,181,074 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#790
of 954 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,238
of 175,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#36
of 43 outputs
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