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Organic matter quantity and source affects microbial community structure and function following volcanic eruption on Kasatochi Island, Alaska

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, July 2015
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Title
Organic matter quantity and source affects microbial community structure and function following volcanic eruption on Kasatochi Island, Alaska
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, July 2015
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.12924
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lydia H. Zeglin, Bronwen Wang, Christopher Waythomas, Frederick Rainey, Sandra L. Talbot

Abstract

In August 2008, Kasatochi volcano erupted and buried a small island in pyroclastic deposits and fine ash; since then, microbes, plants and birds have begun to recolonize the initially sterile surface. Five years post-eruption, bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal ITS copy numbers and extracellular enzyme activity potentials (EEAs) were one to two orders of magnitude greater in pyroclastic materials with organic matter (OM) inputs relative to those without, despite negligible accumulation of OM (< 0.2 %C). When normalized by OM levels, post-eruptive surfaces with OM inputs had the highest β-glucosidase, phosphatase, NAGase and cellobiohydrolase activities, and had microbial population sizes approaching those in reference soils. In contrast, the strongest factor determining bacterial community composition was the dominance of plants versus birds as OM input vectors. While soil pH ranged from 3.9-7.0, and %C ranged 100x, differentiation between plant- and bird-associated microbial communities suggested that cell dispersal or nutrient availability are more likely drivers of assembly than pH or OM content. This study exemplifies the complex relationship between microbial cell dispersal, soil geochemistry, and microbial structure and function, and illustrates the potential for soil microbiota to be resilient to disturbance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 2%
China 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 44 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 40%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 55%
Environmental Science 10 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Unspecified 5 11%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2016.
All research outputs
#9,860,927
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#2,245
of 2,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,125
of 238,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#83
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,046 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,321 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.