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Acute and chronic impact of cardiovascular events on health state utilities

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Acute and chronic impact of cardiovascular events on health state utilities
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0772-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louis S Matza, Katie D Stewart, Shravanthi R Gandra, Philip R Delio, Brett E Fenster, Evan W Davies, Jessica B Jordan, Mickael Lothgren, David H Feeny

Abstract

Cost-utility models are frequently used to compare treatments intended to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular events. Most published utilities represent post-event health states without incorporating the disutility of the event or reporting the time between the event and utility assessment. Therefore, this study estimated health state utilities representing cardiovascular conditions while distinguishing between acute impact including the cardiovascular event and the chronic post-event impact. Health states were drafted and refined based on literature review, clinician interviews, and a pilot study. Three cardiovascular conditions were described: stroke, acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and heart failure. One-year acute health states represented the event and its immediate impact, and post-event health states represented chronic impact. UK general population respondents valued the health states in time trade-off tasks with time horizons of one year for acute states and ten years for chronic states. A total of 200 participants completed interviews (55% female; mean age = 46.6y). Among acute health states, stroke had the lowest utility (0.33), followed by heart failure (0.60) and ACS (0.67). Utility scores for chronic health states followed the same pattern: stroke (0.52), heart failure (0.57), and ACS (0.82). For stroke and ACS, acute utilities were significantly lower than chronic post-event utilities (difference = 0.20 and 0.15, respectively; both p < 0.0001). Results add to previously published utilities for cardiovascular events by distinguishing between chronic post-event health states and acute health states that include the event and its immediate impact. Findings suggest that acute versus chronic impact should be considered when selecting scores for use in cost-utility models. Thus, the current utilities provide a unique option that may be used to represent the acute and chronic impact of cardiovascular conditions in economic models comparing treatments that may delay or prevent the onset of cardiovascular events.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 36%
Other 1 9%
Lecturer 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Psychology 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 July 2015.
All research outputs
#2,593,120
of 5,328,866 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,402
of 2,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#89,796
of 177,526 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#73
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,328,866 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,306 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,526 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.