↓ Skip to main content

Use of traditional and modern contraceptives among childbearing women: findings from a mixed methods study in two southwestern Nigerian states

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
321 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Use of traditional and modern contraceptives among childbearing women: findings from a mixed methods study in two southwestern Nigerian states
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5522-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony Idowu Ajayi, Oladele Vincent Adeniyi, Wilson Akpan

Abstract

Contraceptive use has numerous health benefits such as preventing unplanned pregnancies, ensuring optimum spacing between births, reducing maternal and child mortality, and improving the lives of women and children in general. This study examines the level of contraceptive use, its determinants, reasons for non-use of contraception among women in the reproductive age group (18-49 years) in two southwestern Nigerian states. The study adopted an interviewer-administered questionnaire to collect data from 809 participants selected using a 3-stage cluster random sampling technique. We also conducted 46 in-depth interviews. In order to investigate the association between the socio-demographic variables and use of contraceptive methods, we estimated the binary logistic regression models. The findings indicated that knowledge of any methods of contraception was almost universal among the participants. The rates of ever use and current use of contraception was 80 and 66.6%, respectively. However, only 43.9% of the participants had ever used any modern contraceptive methods, considered to be more reliable. The fear of side effects of modern contraceptive methods drove women to rely on less effective traditional methods (withdrawal and rhythm methods). Some women employed crude and unproven contraceptive methods to prevent pregnancies. Our findings show that the rate of contraceptive use was high in the study setting. However, many women chose less effective traditional contraceptive methods over more effective modern contraceptive methods due to fear of side effects of the latter. Patient education on the various options of modern contraceptives, their side effects and management would be crucial towards expanding the family planning services in the study setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 321 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 321 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 57 18%
Student > Bachelor 40 12%
Researcher 27 8%
Student > Postgraduate 25 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 6%
Other 50 16%
Unknown 102 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 60 19%
Social Sciences 33 10%
Unspecified 9 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 2%
Other 32 10%
Unknown 116 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2019.
All research outputs
#3,141,196
of 20,534,453 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,380
of 13,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,497
of 294,874 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,534,453 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,395 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,874 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them