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Concentration and retention of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts by marine snails demonstrate a novel mechanism for transmission of terrestrial zoonotic pathogens in…

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, July 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Concentration and retention of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts by marine snails demonstrate a novel mechanism for transmission of terrestrial zoonotic pathogens in coastal ecosystems
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, July 2015
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.12927
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colin Krusor, Woutrina A. Smith, M. Tim Tinker, Mary Silver, Patricia A. Conrad, Karen Shapiro

Abstract

The parasite Toxoplasma gondii is an environmentally persistent pathogen that can cause fatal disease in humans, terrestrial warm-blooded animals, and aquatic mammals. While an association between T. gondii exposure and prey specialization on marine snails was identified in threatened California sea otters, the ability of kelp-dwelling snails to transmit terrestrially derived pathogens has not been previously investigated. The objective of this study was to measure concentration and retention of T. gondii by marine snails in laboratory aquaria, and to test for natural T. gondii contamination in field-collected snails. Following exposure to T. gondii-containing seawater, oocysts were detected by microscopy in snail feces and tissues for ten and three days, respectively. Nested PCR was also applied as a method for confirming putative T. gondii oocysts detected in snail feces and tissues by microscopy. Toxoplasma gondii was not detected in field-collected snails. Results suggest that turban snails are competent transport hosts for T. gondii. By concentrating oocysts in fecal pellets, snails may facilitate entry of T. gondii into the nearshore marine food web. This novel mechanism also represents a general pathway by which marine transmission of terrestrially derived microorganisms can be mediated via pathogen concentration and retention by benthic invertebrates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Unspecified 5 11%
Other 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 34%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 26%
Unspecified 6 13%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Other 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,540,840
of 12,348,046 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#1,604
of 2,625 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,418
of 238,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#41
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,348,046 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,625 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.