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The Daily Mile makes primary school children more active, less sedentary and improves their fitness and body composition: a quasi-experimental pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 2,835)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
247 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The Daily Mile makes primary school children more active, less sedentary and improves their fitness and body composition: a quasi-experimental pilot study
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12916-018-1049-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ross A. Chesham, Josephine N. Booth, Emma L. Sweeney, Gemma C. Ryde, Trish Gorely, Naomi E. Brooks, Colin N. Moran

Abstract

The Daily Mile is a physical activity programme made popular by a school in Stirling, Scotland. It is promoted by the Scottish Government and is growing in popularity nationally and internationally. The aim is that each day, during class time, pupils run or walk outside for 15 min (~1 mile) at a self-selected pace. It is anecdotally reported to have a number of physiological benefits including increased physical activity, reduced sedentary behaviour, increased fitness and improved body composition. This study aimed to investigate these reports. We conducted a quasi-experimental repeated measures pilot study in two primary schools in the Stirling Council area: one school with, and one without, intention to introduce the Daily Mile. Pupils at the control school followed their usual curriculum. Of the 504 children attending the schools, 391 children in primary classes 1-7 (age 4-12 years) at the baseline assessment took part. The follow-up assessment was in the same academic year. Outcomes were accelerometer-assessed average daily moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) and average daily sedentary behaviour, 20-m shuttle run fitness test performance and adiposity assessed by the sum of skinfolds at four sites. Valid data at both time points were collected for 118, 118, 357 and 327 children, respectively, for each outcome. After correction for age and gender, significant improvements were observed in the intervention school relative to the control school for MVPA, sedentary time, fitness and body composition. For MVPA, a relative increase of 9.1 min per day (95% confidence interval or 95%CI 5.1-13.2 min, standardised mean difference SMD = 0.407, p = 0.027) was observed. For sedentary time, there was a relative decrease of 18.2 min per day (10.7-25.7 min, SMD = 0.437, p = 0.017). For the shuttle run, there was a relative increase of 39.1 m (21.9-56.3, SMD = 0.236, p = 0.037). For the skinfolds, there was a relative decrease of 1.4 mm (0.8-2.0 mm, SMD = 0.246, p = 0.036). Similar results were obtained when a correction for socioeconomic groupings was included. The findings show that in primary school children, the Daily Mile intervention is effective at increasing levels of MVPA, reducing sedentary time, increasing physical fitness and improving body composition. These findings have relevance for teachers, policymakers, public health practitioners, and health researchers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 247 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 188 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 19%
Student > Bachelor 30 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 11%
Researcher 20 11%
Student > Postgraduate 14 7%
Other 24 13%
Unknown 44 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 38 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 12%
Social Sciences 18 10%
Psychology 12 6%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 54 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 413. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2021.
All research outputs
#42,467
of 18,905,718 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#46
of 2,835 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,391
of 290,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,905,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,835 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them