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Mercury Exposure in a Riverside Amazon Population, Brazil: A Study of the Ototoxicity of Methylmercury

Overview of attention for article published in International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, February 2015
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Title
Mercury Exposure in a Riverside Amazon Population, Brazil: A Study of the Ototoxicity of Methylmercury
Published in
International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, February 2015
DOI 10.1055/s-0034-1544115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana Hoshino, Heloisa Pacheco-Ferreira, Seisse Sanches, Renata Carvallo, Nathália Cardoso, Maurício Perez, Volney Câmara

Abstract

Introduction Mercury poisoning causes hearing loss in humans and animals. Acute and long-term exposures produce irreversible peripheral and central auditory system damage, and mercury in its various forms of presentation in the environment is ototoxic. Objective We investigated the otoacoustic emissions responses in a riverside population exposed to environmental mercury by analyzing the inhibitory effect of the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS) on transient otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). Methods The purpose of the research was to evaluate the entire community independently of variables of sex and age. All of the participants were born and lived in a riverside community. After otolaryngologic evaluation, participants were received tympanometry, evaluation of contralateral acoustic reflexes, pure tone audiometry, and recording of TEOAEs with nonlinear click stimulation. Hair samples were collect to measure mercury levels. Results There was no significant correlation between the inhibitory effect of the MOCS, age, and the level of mercury in the hair. Conclusions The pathophysiological effects of chronic exposure may be subtle and nonspecific and can have a long period of latency; therefore, it will be important to monitor the effects of mercury exposure in the central auditory system of the Amazon population over time. Longitudinal studies should be performed to determine whether the inhibitory effect of the MOCS on otoacoustic emissions can be an evaluation method and diagnostic tool in populations exposed to mercury.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Student > Master 5 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Psychology 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Neuroscience 2 6%
Other 9 27%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,275,690
of 5,141,502 outputs
Outputs from International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
#70
of 228 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,651
of 174,478 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
#7
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,141,502 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 228 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.