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Effect of Physical and Academic Stress on Illness and Injury in Division 1 College Football Players

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 5,469)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
282 tweeters
facebook
20 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
142 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of Physical and Academic Stress on Illness and Injury in Division 1 College Football Players
Published in
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1519/jsc.0000000000001055
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Bryan Mann, Kirk R. Bryant, Brick Johnstone, Patrick A. Ivey, Stephen P. Sayers

Abstract

Stress-injury models of health suggest that athletes experience more physical injuries during times of high stress. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of increased physical and academic stress on injury restrictions for athletes (n=101) on a Division I college football team. Weeks of the season were categorized into three levels: high physical stress (i.e., preseason), high academic stress (i.e., weeks with regularly scheduled examinations such as midterms, finals, and week before Thanksgiving break), and low academic stress (i.e., regular season without regularly scheduled academic examinations). During each week, we recorded whether a player had an injury restriction or not, thereby creating a longitudinal binary outcome. The data was analyzed using a hierarchical logistic regression model to properly account for the dependency induced by the repeated observations over time within each subject. Significance for regression models was accepted at p<0.05. We found that the odds of an injury restriction during training camp (high physical stress) were greatest compared to weeks of high academic stress (OR=2.05, p=0.0003) and low academic stress (OR=3.65, p<0.001). However, the odds of an injury restriction during weeks of high academic stress were nearly twice as high than during weeks of low academic stress (OR=1.78, p=0.0088). Moreover, the difference in injury rates reported in all athletes during weeks of high physical stress and weeks of high academic stress disappeared when considering only athletes that regularly played in games (OR=1.13, p=0.75), suggesting that high academic stress may affect athletes that play to an even greater extent than high physical stress. Coaches should be aware of both types of stressors and consider carefully the types of training methods imposed during times of high academic stress, when injuries are most likely.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 282 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 142 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 137 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 20%
Student > Bachelor 21 15%
Other 8 6%
Researcher 8 6%
Other 26 18%
Unknown 15 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 71 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 8%
Psychology 10 7%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 264. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2020.
All research outputs
#60,943
of 15,568,930 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
#25
of 5,469 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,033
of 237,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
#1
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,568,930 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,469 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,417 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.