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Predictive modelling of habitat selection by marine predators with respect to the abundance and depth distribution of pelagic prey

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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17 X users
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3 Facebook pages
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2 Google+ users

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

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200 Mendeley
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Title
Predictive modelling of habitat selection by marine predators with respect to the abundance and depth distribution of pelagic prey
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, August 2015
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12409
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charlotte Boyd, Ramiro Castillo, George L Hunt, André E Punt, Glenn R VanBlaricom, Henri Weimerskirch, Sophie Bertrand

Abstract

Understanding the ecological processes that underpin species distribution patterns is a fundamental goal in spatial ecology. However, developing predictive models of habitat use is challenging for species that forage in marine environments, as both predators and prey are often highly mobile and difficult to monitor. Consequently, few studies have developed resource selection functions for marine predators based directly on the abundance and distribution of their prey. We analyse contemporaneous data on the diving locations of two seabird species, the shallow-diving Peruvian Booby (Sula variegata) and deeper-diving Guanay Cormorant (Phalacrocorax bougainvilliorum), and the abundance and depth distribution of their main prey, Peruvian anchoveta (Engraulis ringens). Based on this unique dataset, we develop resource selection functions to test the hypothesis that the probability of seabird diving behaviour at a given location is a function of the relative abundance of prey in the upper water column. For both species, we show that the probability of diving behaviour is mostly explained by the distribution of prey at shallow depths. While the probability of diving behaviour increases sharply with prey abundance at relatively low levels of abundance, support for including abundance in addition to the depth distribution of prey is weak, suggesting that prey abundance was not a major factor determining the location of diving behaviour during the study period. The study thus highlights the importance of the depth distribution of prey for two species of seabird with different diving capabilities. The results complement previous research that points towards the importance of oceanographic processes that enhance the accessibility of prey to seabirds. The implications are that locations where prey is predictably found at accessible depths may be more important for surface foragers, such as seabirds, than locations where prey is predictably abundant. Analysis of the relative importance of abundance and accessibility is essential for the design and evaluation of effective management responses to reduced prey availability for seabirds and other top predators in marine systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
United States 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 191 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 47 24%
Researcher 40 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 19%
Student > Bachelor 12 6%
Other 10 5%
Other 22 11%
Unknown 31 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 105 53%
Environmental Science 44 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 1%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 1%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 34 17%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2022.
All research outputs
#2,514,009
of 25,083,571 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#839
of 3,198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,072
of 272,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#13
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,083,571 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,198 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,093 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.