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Influence of in ovo mercury exposure, lake acidity, and other factors on common loon egg and chick quality in Wisconsin

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, June 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Influence of in ovo mercury exposure, lake acidity, and other factors on common loon egg and chick quality in Wisconsin
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, June 2015
DOI 10.1002/etc.3001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kevin P. Kenow, Michael W. Meyer, Ronald Rossmann, Brian R. Gray, Michael T. Arts

Abstract

We conducted a field study in Wisconsin to characterize in ovo mercury (Hg) exposure in common loons (Gavia immer). Total Hg mass fractions ranged from 0.17 to 1.23 µg/g wet weight (ww) in eggs collected from nests on lakes representing a wide range of pH (5.0 - 8.1) and were modeled as a function of maternal loon Hg exposure and egg laying order. Blood total Hg mass fractions in a sample of loon chicks ranged from 0.84 to 3.86 µg/g ww at hatch. Factors, other than mercury exposure, that may have persistent consequences on development of chicks from eggs collected on low pH lakes (i.e., egg selenium, calcium, and fatty acid mass fractions) do not seem to be contributing to reported differences in loon chick quality as a function of lake pH. However, we observed that adult male loons holding territories on neutral-pH lakes were larger on average than those occupying territories on low-pH lakes. Differences in adult body size of common loons holding territories on neutral- versus low-pH lakes may have genetic implications for differences in lake-source-related quality (i.e., size) in chicks. The tendency for high in ovo Hg exposure and smaller adult male size to co-occur in low pH lakes complicates the interpretation of the relative contributions of each to resulting chick quality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 39%
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Student > Master 3 17%
Professor 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 8 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 22%
Chemistry 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2015.
All research outputs
#8,739,905
of 14,483,684 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#2,899
of 4,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,423
of 236,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#45
of 119 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,483,684 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,321 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 119 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.