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Rapid evolution of virulence leading to host extinction under host-parasite coevolution

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid evolution of virulence leading to host extinction under host-parasite coevolution
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0407-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charlotte Rafaluk, Markus Gildenhard, Andreas Mitschke, Arndt Telschow, Hinrich Schulenburg, Gerrit Joop

Abstract

Host-parasite coevolution is predicted to result in changes in the virulence of the parasite in order to maximise its reproductive success and transmission potential, either via direct host-to-host transfer or through the environment. The majority of coevolution experiments, however, do not allow for environmental transmission or persistence of long lived parasite stages, in spite of the fact that these may be critical for the evolutionary success of spore forming parasites under natural conditions. We carried out a coevolution experiment using the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and its natural microsporidian parasite, Paranosema whitei. Beetles and their environment, inclusive of spores released into it, were transferred from generation to generation. We additionally took a modelling approach to further assess the importance of transmissive parasite stages on virulence evolution. In all parasite treatments of the experiment, coevolution resulted in extinction of the host population, with a pronounced increase in virulence being seen. Our modelling approach highlighted the presence of environmental transmissive parasite stages as being critical to the trajectory of virulence evolution in this system. The extinction of host populations was unexpected, particularly as parasite virulence is often seen to decrease in host-parasite coevolution. This, in combination with the increase in virulence and results obtained from the model, suggest that the inclusion of transmissive parasite stages is important to improving our understanding of virulence evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 72 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 29%
Researcher 18 24%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 7 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 17%
Environmental Science 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2015.
All research outputs
#3,584,259
of 7,942,067 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,255
of 1,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,078
of 220,992 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#42
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,942,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,931 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,992 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.