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High serum levels of pregenomic RNA reflect frequently failing reverse transcription in hepatitis B virus particles

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, May 2018
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Title
High serum levels of pregenomic RNA reflect frequently failing reverse transcription in hepatitis B virus particles
Published in
Virology Journal, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12985-018-0994-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kasthuri Prakash, Gustaf E. Rydell, Simon B. Larsson, Maria Andersson, Gunnar Norkrans, Heléne Norder, Magnus Lindh

Abstract

Hepatocytes infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV) produce different HBV RNA species, including pregenomic RNA (pgRNA), which is reverse transcribed during replication. Particles containing HBV RNA are present in serum of infected individuals, and quantification of this HBV RNA could be clinically useful. In a retrospective study of 95 patients with chronic HBV infection, we characterised HBV RNA in serum in terms of concentration, particle association and sequence. HBV RNA was detected by real-time PCR at levels almost as high as HBV DNA. The HBV RNA was protected from RNase and it was found in particles of similar density as particles containing HBV DNA after fractionation on a Nycodenz gradient. Sequencing the epsilon region of the RNA did not reveal mutations that would preclude its binding to the viral polymerase before encapsidation. Specific quantification of precore RNA and pgRNA by digital PCR showed almost seven times lower ratio of precore RNA/pgRNA in serum than in liver tissue, which corresponds to poorer encapsidation of this RNA as compared with pgRNA. The serum ratio between HBV DNA and HBV RNA was higher in genotype D as compared with other genotypes. The results suggest that HBV RNA in serum is present in viral particles with failing reverse transcription activity, which are produced at almost as high rates as viral particles containing DNA. The results encourage further studies of the mechanisms by which these particles are produced, the impact of genotype, and the potential clinical utility of quantifying HBV RNA in serum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 36%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Mathematics 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 10 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2018.
All research outputs
#12,040,647
of 15,136,881 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,863
of 2,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#207,876
of 278,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,136,881 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,358 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
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