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Experimental evidence of genome‐wide impact of ecological selection during early stages of speciation‐with‐gene‐flow

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, June 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Citations

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60 Dimensions

Readers on

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216 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Experimental evidence of genome‐wide impact of ecological selection during early stages of speciation‐with‐gene‐flow
Published in
Ecology Letters, June 2015
DOI 10.1111/ele.12460
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott P. Egan, Gregory J. Ragland, Lauren Assour, Thomas H.Q. Powell, Glen R. Hood, Scott Emrich, Patrik Nosil, Jeffrey L. Feder

Abstract

Theory predicts that speciation-with-gene-flow is more likely when the consequences of selection for population divergence transitions from mainly direct effects of selection acting on individual genes to a collective property of all selected genes in the genome. Thus, understanding the direct impacts of ecologically based selection, as well as the indirect effects due to correlations among loci, is critical to understanding speciation. Here, we measure the genome-wide impacts of host-associated selection between hawthorn and apple host races of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae), a model for contemporary speciation-with-gene-flow. Allele frequency shifts of 32 455 SNPs induced in a selection experiment based on host phenology were genome wide and highly concordant with genetic divergence between co-occurring apple and hawthorn flies in nature. This striking genome-wide similarity between experimental and natural populations of R. pomonella underscores the importance of ecological selection at early stages of divergence and calls for further integration of studies of eco-evolutionary dynamics and genome divergence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 216 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 3%
Canada 3 1%
Japan 2 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 200 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 66 31%
Researcher 35 16%
Student > Master 29 13%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 52 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 152 70%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 14%
Unspecified 18 8%
Environmental Science 14 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 69. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2017.
All research outputs
#246,343
of 13,535,089 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#134
of 2,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,204
of 234,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#6
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,535,089 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,102 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.