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Plasmodium yoelii infection inhibits murine leukaemia WEHI-3 cell proliferation in vivo by promoting immune responses

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, May 2018
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5 tweeters

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Plasmodium yoelii infection inhibits murine leukaemia WEHI-3 cell proliferation in vivo by promoting immune responses
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40249-018-0433-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhen-Zhen Tong, Zheng-Ming Fang, Qi Zhang, Yun Zhan, Yue Zhang, Wan-Fang Jiang, Xiao Hou, Yong-Long Li, Ting Wang

Abstract

Leukaemia is a malignant leukocyte disorder with a high fatality rate, and current treatments for this disease are unsatisfactory. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies for leukaemia must be developed. Malaria parasite infection has been shown to be effective at combating certain neoplasms in animal experiments. This study is to demonstrate the anti-leukaemia activity of malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii (P. yoelii) infection,. In this study, the proportion of CD3, CD19, CD11b and Mac-3 cells was analysed by flow cytometry; the levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in individual serum samples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the phagocytic activity of macrophages and natural killer (NK) cell activity were measured by flow cytometry. We found that P. yoelii infection significantly attenuated the growth of WEHI-3 cells in mice. In addition, tumor cell infiltration into the murine liver and spleen was markedly reduced. We also demonstrated that malaria parasite infection elicited anti-leukaemia activity by promoting immune responses, including increasing the surface markers of T cells (CD3) and B cells (CD19); decreasing the surface markers of monocytes (CD11b) and macrophages (Mac-3); inducing the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α; and increasing NK cell and macrophage activity. Malaria parasite infection significantly decreases the number of myeloblasts and inhibits neoplasm proliferation in mice. In addition, malaria parasite infection inhibits murine leukaemia by promoting immune responses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 38%
Student > Master 2 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 3 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%
Unknown 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2018.
All research outputs
#7,762,411
of 13,807,706 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#219
of 484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,155
of 273,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,807,706 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 484 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them