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Local cortical activity of distant brain areas can phase-lock to the olfactory bulb’s respiratory rhythm in the freely behaving rat

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurophysiology, September 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

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46 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Local cortical activity of distant brain areas can phase-lock to the olfactory bulb’s respiratory rhythm in the freely behaving rat
Published in
Journal of Neurophysiology, September 2018
DOI 10.1152/jn.00088.2018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Rojas-Líbano, Jonathan Wimmer del Solar, Marcelo Aguilar-Rivera, Rodrigo Montefusco-Siegmund, Pedro E. Maldonado

Abstract

An important unresolved question about neural processing is the mechanism by which distant brain areas coordinate their activities and relate their local processing to global neural events. A potential candidate for the local-global integration are slow rhythms such as respiration. In this article, we asked if there are modulations of local cortical processing which are phase-locked to (peripheral) sensory-motor exploratory rhythms. We studied rats on an elevated platform where they would spontaneously display exploratory and rest behaviors. Concurrent with behavior, we monitored whisking through EMG and the respiratory rhythm from the olfactory bulb (OB) local field potential (LFP). We also recorded LFPs from dorsal hippocampus, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex and primary visual cortex. We defined exploration as simultaneous whisking and sniffing above 5 Hz and found that this activity peaked at about 8 Hz. We considered rest as the absence of whisking and sniffing, and in this case, respiration occurred at about 3 Hz. We found a consistent shift across all areas toward these rhythm peaks accompanying behavioral changes. We also found, across areas, that LFP gamma (70-100 Hz) amplitude could phase-lock to the animal's OB respiratory rhythm, a finding indicative of respiration-locked changes in local processing. In a subset of animals, we also recorded the hippocampal theta activity and found that occurred at frequencies overlapped with respiration but was not spectrally coherent with it, suggesting a different oscillator. Our results are consistent with the notion of respiration as a binder or integrator of activity between brain regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 37%
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 33%
Neuroscience 8 27%
Psychology 2 7%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2018.
All research outputs
#849,037
of 15,790,955 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurophysiology
#119
of 6,001 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,649
of 279,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurophysiology
#6
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,790,955 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,001 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,219 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.