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Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly
Published in
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, June 2015
DOI 10.1590/0004-282x20150043
Pubmed ID
Authors

Telma M. R Assis, Aroldo Bacellar, Gersonita Costa, Osvaldo J. M. Nascimento

Abstract

Epilepsy and epileptic seizures are common brain disorders in the elderly and are associated with increased mortality that may be ascribed to the underlying disease or epilepsy-related causes. Objective To describe mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in elderly inpatients.Method Retrospective analysis was performed on hospitalized elderly who had epilepsy or epileptic seizures, from January 2009 to December 2010. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled.Results The most common etiology was ischemic stroke (37%), followed by neoplasias (13%), hemorrhagic stroke (12%), dementias (11.4%) and metabolic disturbances (5.5%). In a univariate analysis, disease duration (p = 0.04), status epilepticus (p < 0.001) and metabolic etiology (p = 0.005) were associated with mortality. However after adjustment by logistic regression, only status epilepticus remained an independent predictor of death (odds ratio = 13; 95%CI = 2.3 to 72; p = 0.004).Conclusion In this study status epilepticus was an independent risk factor for death during hospitalization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 25%
Student > Master 6 14%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 11 25%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 64%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2018.
All research outputs
#7,428,545
of 13,770,158 outputs
Outputs from Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
#265
of 683 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,599
of 233,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria
#16
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,770,158 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 683 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,374 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.