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Will a warmer and wetter future cause extinction of native Hawaiian forest birds?

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
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Title
Will a warmer and wetter future cause extinction of native Hawaiian forest birds?
Published in
Global Change Biology, September 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13005
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Liao, Oliver Elison Timm, Chunxi Zhang, Carter T. Atkinson, Dennis A. LaPointe, Michael D. Samuel

Abstract

Isolation of the Hawaiian archipelago produced a highly endemic and unique avifauna. Avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum), an introduced mosquito-borne pathogen, is a primary cause of extinctions and declines of these endemic honeycreepers. Our research assesses how global climate change will affect future malaria risk and native bird populations. We used an epidemiological model to evaluate future bird-mosquito-malaria dynamics in response to alternative climate projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). Climate changes during the second half of the century accelerate malaria transmission and cause a dramatic decline in bird abundance. Different temperature and precipitation patterns produce divergent trajectories where native birds persist with low malaria infection under a warmer and dryer projection (RCP4.5), but suffer high malaria infection and severe reductions under hot and dry (RCP8.5) or warm and wet (A1B) futures. We conclude that future global climate change will cause significant decreases in the abundance and diversity of remaining Hawaiian bird communities. Because these effects appear unlikely before mid-century, natural resource managers have time to implement conservation strategies to protect this unique avifauna from further decimation. Similar climatic drivers for avian and human malaria suggest that mitigation strategies for Hawai'i have broad application to human health. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 60 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 44%
Environmental Science 15 23%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2016.
All research outputs
#410,037
of 12,385,137 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#483
of 3,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,551
of 236,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#16
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,385,137 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,378 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.