↓ Skip to main content

Out-of-sync: disrupted neural activity in emotional circuitry during film viewing in melancholic depression

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Out-of-sync: disrupted neural activity in emotional circuitry during film viewing in melancholic depression
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep11605
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine C. Guo, Vinh T. Nguyen, Matthew P. Hyett, Gordon B. Parker, Michael J. Breakspear

Abstract

While a rich body of research in controlled experiments has established changes in the neural circuitry of emotion in major depressive disorders, little is known as to how such alterations might translate into complex, naturalistic settings - namely involving dynamic multimodal stimuli with rich contexts, such as those provided by films. Neuroimaging paradigms employing dynamic natural stimuli alleviate the anxiety often associated with complex tasks and eschew the need for laboratory-style abstractions, hence providing an ecologically valid means of elucidating neural underpinnings of neuropsychiatric disorders. To probe the neurobiological signature of refined depression subtypes, we acquired functional neuroimaging data in patients with the melancholic subtype of major depressive disorder during free viewing of emotionally salient films. We found a marked disengagement of ventromedial prefrontal cortex during natural viewing of a film with negative emotional valence in patients with melancholia. This effect significantly correlated with depression severity. Such changes occurred on the background of diminished consistency of neural activity in visual and auditory sensory networks, as well as higher-order networks involved in emotion and attention, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus and right anterior insula. These findings may reflect a failure to re-allocate resources and diminished reactivity to external emotional stimuli in melancholia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 48 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Master 9 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 34%
Neuroscience 10 20%
Unspecified 7 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Other 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2018.
All research outputs
#2,054,868
of 12,380,203 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#14,551
of 55,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,600
of 242,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#422
of 1,798 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,380,203 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55,464 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,185 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,798 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.