↓ Skip to main content

Offering within-category food swaps to reduce energy density of food purchases: a study using an experimental online supermarket

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Offering within-category food swaps to reduce energy density of food purchases: a study using an experimental online supermarket
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12966-015-0241-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzanna E Forwood, Amy L Ahern, Theresa M Marteau, Susan A Jebb, Forwood, Suzanna E, Ahern, Amy L, Marteau, Theresa M, Jebb, Susan A, Suzanna E. Forwood, Amy L. Ahern, Theresa M. Marteau, Susan A. Jebb

Abstract

Swaps are often used to encourage healthier food choices, but there is little evidence of their effectiveness. The current study assessed the impact of offering swaps on groceries purchased within a bespoke online supermarket; specifically the objective was to measure the impact on energy density (ED) of food purchases following the offer of lower ED alternatives (a) at point of selection or at checkout, and (b) with or without explicit consent to receive swap prompts METHOD: Participants were asked to complete a 12-item shopping task within an online shopping platform, developed for studying food purchasing. 1610 adults were randomly assigned to a no swap control condition or to one of four interventions: consented swaps at selection; consented swaps at checkout; imposed swaps at selection; or imposed swaps at checkout. Each swap presented two lower ED options from the same category as the participant's chosen food. Swap acceptance rate and purchased food ED were the primary outcomes. Of the mean 12.36 (SD 1.26) foods purchased, intervention participants were offered a mean of 4.1 (SD 1.68) swaps, with the potential to reduce the ED of purchased food (effect (95 % CI): -83 kJ/100 g (-110 - -56), p = <0.0001). A median of one swap (IQR 0 to 2) was accepted, not significantly reducing the purchased food ED (effect (95 % CI): -24 kJ/100 g (4 - -52), p = 0.094). More swaps were accepted when offered at selection than at checkout (OR (95 % CI) = 1.224 (1.11 - 1.35), p < 0.0001), but no differences were seen with consent. Purchased food ED was unaffected by point of swap or consent, but reduced with number of swaps accepted (effect per swap (95 % CI) = -24 kJ/100 g (-35 - -14), p < 0.0001). Within category swaps did not reduce the ED of food purchases reflecting the observation that the use of swaps within an on-line shopping platform offered small potential gains in ED and a minority was accepted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 30%
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Social Sciences 5 11%
Unspecified 5 11%
Other 15 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2017.
All research outputs
#648,446
of 11,627,913 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#340
of 1,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,696
of 235,429 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#18
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,627,913 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,223 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,429 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.