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Shifts in subsistence type and its impact on the human skull's morphological integration

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Human Biology, June 2015
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Title
Shifts in subsistence type and its impact on the human skull's morphological integration
Published in
American Journal of Human Biology, June 2015
DOI 10.1002/ajhb.22746
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolina Paschetta, Soledad De Azevedo, Marina González, Mirsha Quinto-Sánchez, Celia Cintas, Hugo Varela, Jorge Gómez-Valdés, Gabriela Sánchez-Mejorada, Rolando González-José

Abstract

Here we evaluate morphological integration patterns and magnitudes in different skull regions to detect if shifts in morphological integration are correlated to the appearance of more processed (softer) diets. To do so, three transitional populations were analyzed, including samples from groups that inhabited the same geographical region and for which the evidence shows that major changes occurred in their subsistence mode. Ninety three-dimensional landmarks were digitized on 357 skulls and used as the raw data to develop geometric morphometric analyses. The landmark coordinates were divided into several different regions of biomechanical interest, following a three-level hierarchically nested scheme: the whole skull, further subdivided into neurocranium (divided into the vault and basicranium), the facial (divided into the lower and upper facial), and the masticatory apparatus (divided into alveolar, temporal, and temporo-mandibular joint). Our results indicate that the morphological integration and variability patterns significantly vary across skull regions but are maintained across the transitions. The alveolar border and the lower facial are the regions manifesting greater value of morphological integration and variability, while the upper facial, the temporo-mandibular joint, and the basicranium are highly integrated and poorly variable. The transition to softer diets increased morphological variation across cranial regions that are more exposed to masticatory strains effects. Am. J. Hum. Biol., 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 28%
Student > Master 5 20%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Professor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 24%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Arts and Humanities 2 8%
Computer Science 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2015.
All research outputs
#10,065,455
of 12,582,773 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Human Biology
#727
of 924 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,193
of 232,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Human Biology
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,582,773 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 924 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.3. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.