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Ideophones in Japanese modulate the P2 and late positive complex responses

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychology, July 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Ideophones in Japanese modulate the P2 and late positive complex responses
Published in
Frontiers in Psychology, July 2015
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00933
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lockwood, Gwilym, Tuomainen, Jyrki, Lockwood, G

Abstract

Sound-symbolism, or the direct link between sound and meaning, is typologically and behaviorally attested across languages. However, neuroimaging research has mostly focused on artificial non-words or individual segments, which do not represent sound-symbolism in natural language. We used EEG to compare Japanese ideophones, which are phonologically distinctive sound-symbolic lexical words, and arbitrary adverbs during a sentence reading task. Ideophones elicit a larger visual P2 response than arbitrary adverbs, as well as a sustained late positive complex. Our results and previous literature suggest that the larger P2 may indicate the integration of sound and sensory information by association in response to the distinctive phonology of ideophones. The late positive complex may reflect the facilitated lexical retrieval of arbitrary words in comparison to ideophones. This account provides new evidence that ideophones exhibit similar cross-modal correspondences to those which have been proposed for non-words and individual sounds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 5%
Japan 1 5%
Unknown 17 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Researcher 4 21%
Student > Master 4 21%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 68%
Neuroscience 2 11%
Computer Science 1 5%
Linguistics 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#2,575,822
of 9,679,413 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychology
#3,984
of 9,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,560
of 234,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychology
#233
of 551 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,679,413 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,774 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 551 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.