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PPAR  is a very low-density lipoprotein sensor in macrophages

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2003
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

patent
1 patent

Citations

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240 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
PPAR  is a very low-density lipoprotein sensor in macrophages
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2003
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0337331100
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Chawla, C.-H. Lee, Y. Barak, W. He, J. Rosenfeld, D. Liao, J. Han, H. Kang, R. M. Evans

Abstract

Although triglyceride-rich particles, such as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), contribute significantly to human atherogenesis, the molecular basis for lipoprotein-driven pathogenicity is poorly understood. We demonstrate that in macrophages, VLDL functions as a transcriptional regulator via the activation of the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta. The signaling components of native VLDL are its triglycerides, whose activity is enhanced by lipoprotein lipase. Generation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta null macrophages verifies the absolute requirement of this transcription factor in mediating the VLDL response. Thus, our data reveal a pathway through which dietary triglycerides and VLDL can directly regulate gene expression in atherosclerotic lesions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Japan 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 63 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Researcher 11 16%
Professor 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Master 7 10%
Other 17 25%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 6%
Unspecified 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 8 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2010.
All research outputs
#2,884,008
of 10,775,573 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#34,795
of 69,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,776
of 98,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#305
of 486 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,775,573 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 69,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,506 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 486 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.