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Seasonal variation in diagnosis of invasive cutaneous melanoma in Eastern England and Scotland

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Epidemiology, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Seasonal variation in diagnosis of invasive cutaneous melanoma in Eastern England and Scotland
Published in
Cancer Epidemiology, August 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.canep.2015.06.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fiona M. Walter, Gary A. Abel, Georgios Lyratzopoulos, Jane Melia, David Greenberg, David H. Brewster, Helen Butler, Pippa G. Corrie, Christine Campbell

Abstract

Worldwide, the incidence of cutaneous melanoma has been reported to be highest in the summer and lowest in the winter. Northern Irish data suggested seasonal variation for women only, especially those with thinner melanomas, sited on limbs. We interrogated two larger UK cancer registries for temporal differences in melanoma diagnosis and associated patient characteristics. Melanomas diagnosed from 2006 to 2010 in the Eastern England and Scottish cancer registries (n=11,611) were analysed by month of diagnosis, patient demographics and melanoma characteristics, using descriptive and multivariate modelling methods. More patients with melanoma were diagnosed in the summer months (June 9.9%, July 9.7%, August 9.8%) than the winter months (December 7.2%, January 7.2%, February 7.1%) and this pattern was consistent in both regions. There was evidence that the seasonal patterns varied by sex (p=0.015), melanoma thickness (p=0.002), body site (p=0.006), and type (superficial spreading melanomas p=0.005). The seasonal variation was greatest for diagnosis of melanomas occurring on the limbs. This study has confirmed seasonal variation in melanoma diagnosis in Eastern England and Scotland across almost all population demographics and melanoma characteristics studied, with higher numbers diagnosed in the summer months, particularly on the limbs. Seasonal patterns in skin awareness and related help-seeking are likely to be implicated. Targeted patient interventions to increase sun awareness and encourage year-long skin inspection are warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Namibia 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 27%
Unspecified 3 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 7%
Psychology 1 7%
Other 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,191,967
of 12,547,694 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Epidemiology
#146
of 596 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,712
of 232,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Epidemiology
#14
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,547,694 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 596 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,231 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.