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Insights into nutritionists’ practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

Overview of attention for article published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, April 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
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Title
Insights into nutritionists’ practices and experiences in remote Australian Aboriginal communities
Published in
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12351
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan L. Colles, Suzanne Belton, Julie Brimblecombe

Abstract

To explore and describe methods of communication, education practices, perceived challenges and the potential role of nutritionists working in remote Australian Aboriginal communities in order to inform future public health efforts. Nutritionists who work or have worked in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia's Northern Territory within the past decade were identified via purposive and snowball sampling, and responded to a semi-structured survey in 2012. Content and interpretive thematic analysis was used to generate themes. Working approaches of 33 nutritionists are presented, representing 110 years of working experience in the Northern Territory. Emerging themes included: 'Community consultation is challenging', 'Partnering with local people is vital', 'Information is not behaviour', 'Localisation of nutrition education is important' and 'Evaluation is tricky'. Available time, training background and workforce structure were said to constrain practice and those nutritionists with longer experience described a more culturally competent practice. Modifications in structure, training and support of the public health nutrition workforce, facilitation of professional and cultural partnerships, outcome evaluation and localisation and evaluation of health messages may promote more meaningful nutrition communication in remote communities. Findings can inform further investigation into the structures needed to improve public health skills for nutritionists transitioning from mainstream practice into the challenging cross-cultural context of Aboriginal health settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 68 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 28%
Student > Master 14 20%
Researcher 6 9%
Other 4 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 20%
Social Sciences 9 13%
Psychology 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2018.
All research outputs
#5,509,770
of 19,670,152 outputs
Outputs from Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
#901
of 1,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,525
of 242,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
#16
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,670,152 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,908 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,095 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.